A Note on Fieldwork

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A key element of the fieldwork involves the contrasting narratives of management and workers with regard to conflict and cooperation in the workplace. Through exploring contrasting accounts between workers and mangers at the sectorial level, I will be able to articulate the politics of ‘service’ production in the workplace. From the data, I hope to be able to detail different perceptions of the labour process, as well as the modes of conflict and cooperation.I hope to build on materialist theories of the ’structured antagonism’ as well as the political dimensions of the value-form literature.

With regard to workers’ experience in the hospitality industry, I’ve found the prime mover of the employment relation is whether the contracted staff are agency or in-house. The secondary factor which determines different conditions are then between staff who receive remittances from the trunc system and those that don’t. The trunc system is a major source of conflict. Despite working for different companies, workers across the industry have remarkably similar conditions and issues. Each interviewee has so far given both a portrait of their workplace, as well as highlighted key conflicts over the course of their employment. It is clear that the rhetoric and strategy of managers contrasts with many of the accounts from workers themselves. However, this is most stark when they are a member of a union. Unionised workers often tell me that they speak up and aren’t afraid to say when things aren’t right. Most of the nonunion workers I’ve talked to try to adopt the views of management and often internalise them – the ’new spirit of capitalism’ is relevant here as well as Hochschild’s ‘managed heart’.

At the professional level, workers’ dissenting narratives are often missing. For example, the British Hospitality Association – the main industrial lobbying body in the UK – provides a wealth of literature on the industry and argues for its economic significance for the national economy. However, they ostentatiously omit accounts of the reality of work for most nonsupervisory and non managerial staff. Participants’ accounts of workplace tensions and the various tactics that mangers use to suppress dissent – from intimidation to wage theft – will be used as a counterpoint to the managerial narratives that I have collected so far, which fail to recognise the same problems at work. Most managers give a fairly glossy picture of their workplace despite the fact that the industry is plagued by violations and low pay.

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